Differing Retirement Opinions

We may be 20 but it’s never too late to think about retirement. I won’t be eligible to contribute to my job’s 401(k) until the end of September, when I’ve been here full time for a year. Tej will be able to contribute to his in April. When I brought up Roth IRAs and investing, his opinion was strong: no.

The Mr. doesn’t “believe” in investing; any potential faith in it was destroyed along with the stock market crash a few years back. I keep telling him that there’s ways around it, especially if we won’t be retiring for at least 30 years, but he’s dead set against it.

I, myself, have been reading personal finance blogs for a while now and I’m buying into the hype. I feel the urge to not only fund a Roth IRA, but max it out. I know Dave Ramsey says not to invest until you pay off your debt, but I believe I can do it simultaneously. I opened a Roth IRA with Zecco and looking to start funding it biweekly in February. If I start contributing $200/month every month for the next 30 years, we’ll have an additional $72,000 to play with when it comes time to retire. Even better, if I can max it out every year for 30 years, that’s $150,000. Numbers like that are too alluring to ignore.

When I get out of debt, I plan on doing some more investing, most likely through P2P lending, like through Lending Club. I can only see the benefits of it since retirement is so far away, if something does happen, my money has time to recover.

What do you think? Do you think it’s smart to fund a Roth IRA outside of your employer’s 401(k) plan? Is investing too risky, even when retirement is so far away?

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One Response to Differing Retirement Opinions

  1. I think there are points to both sides. I’ve read blogs where the author thought retirement investments were iffy because 1) the stock market could crash right before you retire and 2) you’re not guaranteed to live to retirement age. Investing in your retirement is hedging your bets. It’s kind of like insurance. You’re betting that you’ll live long enough to make use of that money.

    I was also going to point out that your retirement numbers don’t account for your investment return – usually around 8% each year. Add compound interest to that, and you’ll have much more than $72,000 when you retire. :) I hope Tej comes around eventually.

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